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Fall3

October 17, 2012

For all you city slickers, this is a STRAW fort. Straw is the spent stalk of wheat, and it is used for animal bedding. Animals do not eat it. Hay is basically alfalfa or clover and weeds. Cattle eat it and it is much too itchy to use for hayrides.

So from now on, it is no longer a “hay” ride, but a STRAW ride.

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2 comments

  1. Sorgam (another grain grass) is also added to “hay” mixtures – especially as a feed for cattle and hogs.
    Straw is also fed to animals, though. Its more for ruffage and not really digested well – like eating lettuce for people – and doesn’t contain a lot of nutrients. It is used mainly with cattle who are fed more of a corn-based diet, rather than cows who graze for food. Cows aren’t really supposed to eat corn, so the straw provides needed fiber and helps to keep them “clean”. Its main purpose is for animal bedding and removal moisture.

    Farmers feed corn to cows, along with hormones and anti-viral/anti-bacterial materials because it allows them to gain weight quickly. Without close monitoring and a lot of science, that diet would kill a normal cow. That is why eating “organic” beef is so popular. Organic beef is 100% better than the stuff you buy at the grocery store. I highly recommend that you purchase a deep freezer chest and buy your beef from a farm where they graze the cows. Buy a 1/4 or 1/2 cow at a time.You’ll have the best beef and steaks that you ever tasted.

    I have a little farm experience where I come from, too.


  2. I love the pics Matt! Never seen them before. Hope they used straw 🙂



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